Archive | January, 2016

Yes!South Africa’s Black Cricketers Can Play And Win In International Cricket! By Cheryl Roberts

26 Jan

IMG_6691If anything, and without dampening South Africa’s victory celebrations after winning the final Test match in a Test series already lost to England, this summer’s home Test cricket series demonstrated the truth that black people can play international cricket and demythologised the myth that white cricketers have superior cricket playing ability in SA.

The spectacular and devastating batting, bowling and fielding of South Africa’s black cricketers throughout the series (I use black to mean, African, Coloured and Indian-origin people) has been awesome. Yes, South Africa did lose the Test series, but the black cricketers played and shone in patches of individual world class cricket.

South African cricket has battled with race and colour since the sport was unified, over 20 years ago and cricket began to be administered and played under one cricket federation. It has been a constant struggle in the boardroom amongst officials, amongst the selectors, between players in conversation with each other about the playing ability of black cricketers.

This home Test series doesn’t signify the arrival of black cricketers in world cricket. The black cricketers with international ability have always been there. But they were not given the chances to demonstrate their ability and to prove themselves. It was always the white cricketers who were given much more chances.

There has been this persistent myth in the minds of many white people that white cricketers had superior cricket ability, that black cricketers had to be developed and nurtured. Over the past two decades, several White cricket captains, although they will deny this) including Adrian Kuiper, Kepler Wessels, Hansie Cronje, Graeme Smith and AB de Villiers vehemently believed in white superiority in SA’s national cricket team.

Apartheid’s players like Barry Richards, Clive Rice and many others only believe in white cricketers. According to these white cricket supremacists, blacks players are always lacking in something. Black cricketers have to struggle, battle, contest, work extra hard to be given just one chance.

But who can deny the world class playing abilities of young fast bowling sensation, Kagiso Rabada, of elegant batsman Hashim Amla, and the talent being shown by batsman and fielder Temba Bavuma? Albeit a talented player JP Duminy, has not performed in this Test series and may well be on his way out of the national team. But there will always be black and white cricketers who should perform according to their talent, but just don’t.

Caretaker captain, AB de Villiers struggles to believe in black cricket talent. He really does! When it’s a toss up between a white cricketer and black cricketer, it’s the white cricketer that AB de Villiers believes in because of his whiteness and white privilege mentality.

There is no debate when I say that black cricketers have been done in, marginalised and broken down by the mentality of whiteness and white privilege prevailing in the corridors of South African cricket.

A few months ago, Black African players themselves reached a moment of ‘we’ve had enough of being drinks carriers’ and challenged CSA in a letter written to the cricket body. Pressure had to be placed on CSA and their selectors to look beyond whiteness and see the talent of black cricketers.

Reports of white cricketers being on the verge of striking because of ‘quota players’ proves white people’s insecurities in South African sport in general and SA cricket, in particular. Why are white cricketers so keen to strike to protect their whiteness and white privilege, yet they never speak out against the marginalisation of Black African cricketers?

Get this! Blacks didn’t start being introduced to cricket with Ali Bacher’s development programmes. Black people started playing cricket over a century ago. Throughout the anti-apartheid era, there existed black cricketers of world class ability who were denied the human right of representing a democratic country.

The black cricketers are here and want to be selected for their abilities. The struggle of representation within South African cricket is still very heated and ongoing. As more black cricketers are selected, white players will become angry as their white privilege fades, in the national cricket team. This challenge must be guarded and advanced by smashing the myth of white cricketers having superior playing ability and the genuine desire to give cricketers of all colours the chance their playing abilities deserve.

Never again must Black African cricketers be overlooked, ignored and marginalised in South African cricket. Never!

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To Be World Class In Sport, SA’s Sportswomen Need More Funding By Cheryl Roberts

14 Jan

It’s now official that the SASCOC decision is that the South African women’s hockey team and the South African women’s rugby sevens team, despite qualifying for the 2016 Rio Olympics, will not be participating in the Olympics and will not be representing SA. However, despite their low international ranking and being nowhere near world class or potential Olympic medalists or finalists, women’s football will be participating in the Rio Olympics.

This is the SASCOC ruling, taken at Board level and at council representation of sports federations affiliated to SASCOC, applicable to both women’s and men’s teams, and sportswomen and sportsmen when it comes to 2016 Olympic participation.

SASCOC has taken a decision, over a year ago, that Olympic qualification would not necessarily mean Olympic participation and representation for South Africa. The reason for this decision, according to SASCOC, is that South African Olympic qualifiers must be one of potential, possible and probable Olympic medallists and finalists. SASCOC argues that world class achievement is what the sports body is after; not mediocre placings.

Had there been solidarity amongst women’s sports teams and women athletes, there would have been much protest and resistance to this decision. Shouldn’t the women’s football teams should also protest and stand in solidarity with the women’s hockey and women’s rugby sevens team? But, in the absence of national resistance movement against the gender inequalities in sport, those who hold and wield power in sports officialdom believe they can officiate sport while gender inequalities and gender struggles thrive.

I’m arguing for solidarity amongst the women’s teams because hockey, rugby and football are all affected by sport’s gender inequalities of unequal, inadequate, unfair  sports sponsorship and funding.

Women’s football, although very weak internationally shouldn’t be going to the Rio Olympics, according to the SASCOC ruling. However, women’s football escaped via a FIFA ruling that Africa’s women’s football teams would qualify only via Africa for the Rio Olympics and no other way of an international ranking, even if the African team was ranked lower than other countries who should be participating in the Olympics.

The common ground for resistance and protest to take root is because women’s sports and South Africa’s women athletes are unequally funded in sports sponsorship and financial assistance; this financial burden impacting negatively on SA’s sports women’s participation internationally.

SASCOC correctly takes and should take decisions in the interest of South African sport. Nothing wrong with that! But when the decisions are against struggling women in sport, who participate in sport in chains, taken by male-dominated sports boards and officials, then we must ask for intervention in the interests of sportswomen.

How do you apply and implement the same ruling at the top of SA sport, for both men and women in sport when we have an imbalance and unequal sports network? How are struggling women participating in sport expected to become world class and achieve high international rankings when they participate internationally with meagre funding and sometimes have to personally pay their costs to represent their country internationally.

SASCOC should take such decisions knowing that SA’s sportswomen were honestly assisted and funded to participate internationally. I’m of the opinion that this ruling should be reviewed for future Olympic participation. How do you take such a decision while the men’s sports of football, rugby and cricket receive SA’s majority funding with some handouts given now and then to women in sport and sportswomen?

If we accept that SASCOC exists to advance South African sport then we must question

why they don’t focus on the gender inequalities and imbalances which exist in the sports network and which subsequently impacts negatively on women’s sport in SA.

For now, the sportswomen are on their own with their sports federations and sports officials whom, I’m of my opinion, don’t speak up for sports teams and players. Sports people have got to use their power and protest and resist and challenge, for instance, embark on protest marches to parliament and demand adequate and sufficient sports funding for SA’s sportswomen. IMG_7942

SA’s Black Sports Players Need Black Conscious Mindsets By Cheryl Roberts

12 Jan

South Africa’s Black sportspeople, particularly players and coaches are sadly lacking the tough black conscious minds and mental capacity which they need to participate as human beings in South African sport and dislodge the chains which have them bound in seemingly perpetual ‘development and inferior to white merit’ mindsets.

This weak and inferior mind of players and coaches allows whiteness to dominate and, blacks in white-dominated sports especially, lack the strength to believe in the might of their blackness.

I’m of the opinion that South Africa’s back sports people in the democratic era of international sports don’t only have weak mindsets but they also possess something of an inferior consciousness in relation to their white counterparts and sports friends.

This is a particularly true and honest reflection in national sports and teams such as hockey, rugby, cricket, netball, swimming that are white player dominated and white-coach dominated.

Despite contested debates and critical challenges about white and elite domination of sports teams in South Africa, our country’s democratic era sportspeople have been participating in sport with seemingly no political or social justice consciousness.

The players have come into sport and been encouraged to participate in sport as if sport exists outside of society and its social inequalities and social justice demands.

Unlike sportspeople of the anti-apartheid sports struggle, who were highly conscientised and understood they participated in sport for freedom from oppression, contemporary sportspeople are taught only how to play sport and sharpen sports techniques and to have provincial and national ambitions in sport. Political and social education isn’t encouraged or dished out in sport in South Africa. Most sports federations and sports officials inhibit social consciousness expression by sportswomen and sportsmen.

Although they don’t readily admit it publicly, Black (people of all colours not white) players and athletes in sport suffer inferior complexes. Black sportspeople are missing a black consciousness mentality; that black consciousness espoused by black consciousness philosopher, Steve Biko which emphasises belief in one’s black identity as being our strength and pride and not being inferior to whiteness.

Look at South Africa’s black internationals in some sports like rugby, cricket and hockey. Over the past two decades, these black players have been unable to speak out against white privilege in national sports selection, about the pressure brought on black players to perform to prove their sports talent because black sports talent needs justification by whites.

Many reasons and opinions have been argued about Hashim Amla’s captaincy of the SA men’s cricket team. For me, one of Amla’s weaknesses and deficiencies was his lack of a black consciousness mindset. I was surprised when he spoke out, after his resignation from the SA Test captaincy,  about how ‘players of colour’ were doubted. At all times he was asked for a comment or media interview, Hashim Amla avoided social justice dialogue or opinion. Make no mistake, Amla is indeed a world class cricket batsman. But he’s the type of black sportsman that prefers to position sport as being divorced from society; at least, that’s the impression he gave.

This non-political education of South Africa’s born frees and young adults who have grown up in post-apartheid South Africa, has impacted on mindsets of black players and athletes and coaches. The strength and power of whiteness, and white privilege is massive within white-dominated sports teams such as rugby, swimming, hockey, cricket, swimming and netball.

Should the black athletes and players have black consciousness minds and consciousness they will possess black toughness needed to sustain their blackness in white-dominated sports, where white players as a bloc group together and fight for their whiteness to be viewed as merit while blackness in the sports team is viewed as development and must be justified for selection.

Sports federations don’t encourage political discussion because they are of the false ‘thinking that sport and politics don’t mix’. Sportspeople are quietened into submission to believe this false perception of society and the social positioning of sport. The white dominated sports teams rule with whiteness, while black players/athletes never speak positively of their black identity.

An education in the teachings of black consciousness and an embrace of a black consciousness mindset would have rocketed the black players’ mental capacity to believe in their blackness, to challenge whiteness and to be critical of attempts to enforce black players as being ‘non-merit’ players.

This weak and uncritical consciousness of black players and coaches has its roots in the early stage of post-apartheid, democratic era of sport in transforming SA, when development of sport became associated with black communities and synonymous with blacks. Black players, coaches and athletes battled to fight off the perception they had only ‘developing talent’ in sport which required years of nurturing into international mold. This wasn’t how white players and coaches were perceived. Whites were treated as merit and selected as talented players and coaches because of merit.

International Black players have been quietly silenced about their conscious opinion about the social positioning of sport in South African society. They’ve never called out white privilege and or asserted their blackness. It’s only years later, after they have retired from international sport, that some of them reveal the racism they encountered and their weak relationships with white players.

Black Consciousness mindsets and consciousness is not racism! It will not give sportspeople a false prejudice but a positive state of mind to believe in their blackness. This black consciousness will benefit black sports players, administrators, coaches to be mentally strong and to believe in the power of their blackness. It will also eliminate the arrogance of whiteness in South African sport.

IMG_6256

hashim amla, sa test cricket captain (before he resigned)

Why Are SA’s Non-Performing Sports Men Heavily Sponsored, Unlike SA’s Performing Sportswomen? By Cheryl Roberts

4 Jan

In the sports that South Africa’s men in sport are drowning in money privilege, the sportsmen produce below par performance and at times, disgusting results. South Africa’s sportswomen don’t have the luxury of money. Given their financial constraints, they amazingly inspiring and achieve positive results.

In the heavily sponsored men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf, South Africa’s international men’s sport performances, over the past year, have been embarrassing and disappointing.

Yet, women’s sports with the little sponsorship and financial handouts here and there, now and then, achieved credible results while participating in sport with chains around them.

This unequal, unjust and unfair sponsorship of men’s sport while women in sport receive handouts and crumbs, must be stopped. Because of structural gender inequalities in sport, our society and country is being deprived of developing girls and women in sport. And this is being done while boys and men are being looked after very healthily and indulgently.

I’m of the opinion that no national and provincial government funding should be given to men in corporate sports, whose sports are corporate backed and supported. Working class boys and men in sport should be assisted and funded because corporates exist by suffocating and strangling the working class from whom they extract their profits.

Why do men’s sports get massive sports funding from corporate South Africa? Given their embarrassing results attained in their sports world of privilege, sponsorship and funding should be cut with more funding to sportswomen to help women in sport grow.

The evidence is glaring that South Africa associates most of its sports money with men’s sport and very little money with sportswomen. A billion rand and more sports industry associates sport with men in sport and male prowess in sport as being what sport and achievement is about. Women in sport and sportswomen get the crumbs and little financial handouts here and there to assist development and growth of women’s sport.

If women in sport can attain commendable international results such as world class, world and Olympic champion, top ten international rankings, given their ‘second class citizen’ sports funding allocation, then we are missing out on what the sportswomen can really deliver in a sports environment which protects and advances sportswomen instead of dissing women and holding them in servitude mode, always dependent on handouts and unsure if they’ll have adequate funding to realise their annual sports ambitions.

I know that global sport is extremely competitive; that only the best win world and continental titles and international open events and not every sportsman or sports team can be the best.

Just look at South Africa’s men’s football team in 2015, together with the rugby and cricket teams and golf. They were professional sportsmen, paid lucrative salaries and bonuses. And what did they do?

Towards the end of 2015, South Africa’s sportswomen were dealt unkind boardroom decisions. Although three SA women’s teams of football, rugby and hockey achieved Rio Olympic qualification, the teams were told they not ‘good enough’ for SASCOC’s medal aspirations. The Olympic berths of South Africa’s women’s hockey and women’s rugby sevens teams have been taken away while Banyana Banyana have escaped narrowly, by virtue of the African Olympic qualifiers being their only route to qualification, despite South Africa’s women’s football team being very weak and lowly ranked internationally.

South Africa’s indulgent sports of men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf have, over generations, attained the sports funding, not because they had the sports prowess but because they were men and were seen as the supreme gender in a male-dominating, male-controlled society.

How is South Africa’s sportswomen expected to be world class and achieve top world rankings when they must struggle for funding? The men’s teams of football, cricket and rugby don’t struggle; they get all their sport needs taken care of. All the sportsmen have to do is turn up and deliver.

Structural inequality exists in the South African sports network and apparatus with white privilege, black middle class access and male privilege dominating access to and participation in sport from grassroots to international domains.

By suffocating development and growth of girls and women in sport, we are depriving millions of girls and women from knowing their worth in sport. Why do we entrench the gender inequalities with screwed and unequal sponsorship? Why do we allow women’s sport to be strangled and men’s sport to thrive.

Non-performing and under-achieving sportsmen should not be recipients and beneficiaries of massive and lucrative sports funding and sponsorship. Performing and achieving sportswomen must be financially supported to achieve in world sport and know their international potential.

The juncture is ripe for sportswomen and women in sport to protest unequal funding in sport. Protest and resistance must disrupt gender inequalities in sport!

IMG_4036

women rugby players in south africa (pic: cheryl roberts)

Why Are SA’s Non-Performing Sports Men Heavily Sponsored, Unlike SA’s Performing Sportswomen? By Cheryl Roberts

4 Jan

In the sports that South Africa’s men in sport are drowning in money privilege, the sportsmen produce below par performance and at times, disgusting results. South Africa’s sportswomen don’t have the luxury of money. Given their financial constraints, they amazingly inspiring and achieve positive results.

In the heavily sponsored men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf, South Africa’s international men’s sport performances, over the past year, have been embarrassing and disappointing.

Yet, women’s sports with the little sponsorship and financial handouts here and there, now and then, achieved credible results while participating in sport with chains around them.

This unequal, unjust and unfair sponsorship of men’s sport while women in sport receive handouts and crumbs, must be stopped. Because of structural gender inequalities in sport, our society and country is being deprived of developing girls and women in sport. And this is being done while boys and men are being looked after very healthily and indulgently.

I’m of the opinion that no national and provincial government funding should be given to men in corporate sports, whose sports are corporate backed and supported. Working class boys and men in sport should be assisted and funded because corporates exist by suffocating and strangling the working class from whom they extract their profits.

Why do men’s sports get massive sports funding from corporate South Africa? Given their embarrassing results attained in their sports world of privilege, sponsorship and funding should be cut with more funding to sportswomen to help women in sport grow.

The evidence is glaring that South Africa associates most of its sports money with men’s sport and very little money with sportswomen. A billion rand and more sports industry associates sport with men in sport and male prowess in sport as being what sport and achievement is about. Women in sport and sportswomen get the crumbs and little financial handouts here and there to assist development and growth of women’s sport.

If women in sport can attain commendable international results such as world class, world and Olympic champion, top ten international rankings, given their ‘second class citizen’ sports funding allocation, then we are missing out on what the sportswomen can really deliver in a sports environment which protects and advances sportswomen instead of dissing women and holding them in servitude mode, always dependent on handouts and unsure if they’ll have adequate funding to realise their annual sports ambitions.

I know that global sport is extremely competitive; that only the best win world and continental titles and international open events and not every sportsman or sports team can be the best.

Just look at South Africa’s men’s football team in 2015, together with the rugby and cricket teams and golf. They were professional sportsmen, paid lucrative salaries and bonuses. And what did they do?

Towards the end of 2015, South Africa’s sportswomen were dealt unkind boardroom decisions. Although three SA women’s teams of football, rugby and hockey achieved Rio Olympic qualification, the teams were told they not ‘good enough’ for SASCOC’s medal aspirations. The Olympic berths of South Africa’s women’s hockey and women’s rugby sevens teams have been taken away while Banyana Banyana have escaped narrowly, by virtue of the African Olympic qualifiers being their only route to qualification, despite South Africa’s women’s football team being very weak and lowly ranked internationally.

South Africa’s indulgent sports of men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf have, over generations, attained the sports funding, not because they had the sports prowess but because they were men and were seen as the supreme gender in a male-dominating, male-controlled society.

How is South Africa’s sportswomen expected to be world class and achieve top world rankings when they must struggle for funding? The men’s teams of football, cricket and rugby don’t struggle; they get all their sport needs taken care of. All the sportsmen have to do is turn up and deliver.

Structural inequality exists in the South African sports network and apparatus with white privilege, black middle class access and male privilege dominating access to and participation in sport from grassroots to international domains.

By suffocating development and growth of girls and women in sport, we are depriving millions of girls and women from knowing their worth in sport. Why do we entrench the gender inequalities with screwed and unequal sponsorship? Why do we allow women’s sport to be strangled and men’s sport to thrive.

Non-performing and under-achieving sportsmen should not be recipients and beneficiaries of massive and lucrative sports funding and sponsorship. Performing and achieving sportswomen must be financially supported to achieve in world sport and know their international potential.

The juncture is ripe for sportswomen and women in sport to protest unequal funding in sport. Protest and resistance must disrupt gender inequalities in sport!     In the sports that South Africa’s men in sport are drowning in money privilege, the sportsmen produce below par performance and at times, disgusting results. South Africa’s sportswomen don’t have the luxury of money. Given their financial constraints, they amazingly inspiring and achieve positive results.
In the heavily sponsored men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf, South Africa’s international men’s sport performances, over the past year, have been embarrassing and disappointing.
Yet, women’s sports with the little sponsorship and financial handouts here and there, now and then, achieved credible results while participating in sport with chains around them.
This unequal, unjust and unfair sponsorship of men’s sport while women in sport receive handouts and crumbs, must be stopped. Because of structural gender inequalities in sport, our society and country is being deprived of developing girls and women in sport. And this is being done while boys and men are being looked after very healthily and indulgently.
I’m of the opinion that no national and provincial government funding should be given to men in corporate sports, whose sports are corporate backed and supported. Working class boys and men in sport should be assisted and funded because corporates exist by suffocating and strangling the working class from whom they extract their profits.
Why do men’s sports get massive sports funding from corporate South Africa? Given their embarrassing results attained in their sports world of privilege, sponsorship and funding should be cut with more funding to sportswomen to help women in sport grow.
The evidence is glaring that South Africa associates most of its sports money with men’s sport and very little money with sportswomen. A billion rand and more sports industry associates sport with men in sport and male prowess in sport as being what sport and achievement is about. Women in sport and sportswomen get the crumbs and little financial handouts here and there to assist development and growth of women’s sport.
If women in sport can attain commendable international results such as world class, world and Olympic champion, top ten international rankings, given their ‘second class citizen’ sports funding allocation, then we are missing out on what the sportswomen can really deliver in a sports environment which protects and advances sportswomen instead of dissing women and holding them in servitude mode, always dependent on handouts and unsure if they’ll have adequate funding to realise their annual sports ambitions.
I know that global sport is extremely competitive; that only the best win world and continental titles and international open events and not every sportsman or sports team can be the best.
Just look at South Africa’s men’s football team in 2015, together with the rugby and cricket teams and golf. They were professional sportsmen, paid lucrative salaries and bonuses. And what did they do?
Towards the end of 2015, South Africa’s sportswomen were dealt unkind boardroom decisions. Although three SA women’s teams of football, rugby and hockey achieved Rio Olympic qualification, the teams were told they not ‘good enough’ for SASCOC’s medal aspirations. The Olympic berths of South Africa’s women’s hockey and women’s rugby sevens teams have been taken away while Banyana Banyana have escaped narrowly, by virtue of the African Olympic qualifiers being their only route to qualification, despite South Africa’s women’s football team being very weak and lowly ranked internationally.
South Africa’s indulgent sports of men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf have, over generations, attained the sports funding, not because they had the sports prowess but because they were men and were seen as the supreme gender in a male-dominating, male-controlled society.
How is South Africa’s sportswomen expected to be world class and achieve top world rankings when they must struggle for funding? The men’s teams of football, cricket and rugby don’t struggle; they get all their sport needs taken care of. All the sportsmen have to do is turn up and deliver.
Structural inequality exists in the South African sports network and apparatus with white privilege, black middle class access and male privilege dominating access to an

In the sports that South Africa’s men in sport are drowning in money privilege, the sportsmen produce below par performance and at times, disgusting results. South Africa’s sportswomen don’t have the luxury of money. Given their financial constraints, they amazingly inspiring and achieve positive results.

In the heavily sponsored men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf, South Africa’s international men’s sport performances, over the past year, have been embarrassing and disappointing.

Yet, women’s sports with the little sponsorship and financial handouts here and there, now and then, achieved credible results while participating in sport with chains around them.

This unequal, unjust and unfair sponsorship of men’s sport while women in sport receive handouts and crumbs, must be stopped. Because of structural gender inequalities in sport, our society and country is being deprived of developing girls and women in sport. And this is being done while boys and men are being looked after very healthily and indulgently.

I’m of the opinion that no national and provincial government funding should be given to men in corporate sports, whose sports are corporate backed and supported. Working class boys and men in sport should be assisted and funded because corporates exist by suffocating and strangling the working class from whom they extract their profits.

Why do men’s sports get massive sports funding from corporate South Africa? Given their embarrassing results attained in their sports world of privilege, sponsorship and funding should be cut with more funding to sportswomen to help women in sport grow.

The evidence is glaring that South Africa associates most of its sports money with men’s sport and very little money with sportswomen. A billion rand and more sports industry associates sport with men in sport and male prowess in sport as being what sport and achievement is about. Women in sport and sportswomen get the crumbs and little financial handouts here and there to assist development and growth of women’s sport.

If women in sport can attain commendable international results such as world class, world and Olympic champion, top ten international rankings, given their ‘second class citizen’ sports funding allocation, then we are missing out on what the sportswomen can really deliver in a sports environment which protects and advances sportswomen instead of dissing women and holding them in servitude mode, always dependent on handouts and unsure if they’ll have adequate funding to realise their annual sports ambitions.

I know that global sport is extremely competitive; that only the best win world and continental titles and international open events and not every sportsman or sports team can be the best.

Just look at South Africa’s men’s football team in 2015, together with the rugby and cricket teams and golf. They were professional sportsmen, paid lucrative salaries and bonuses. And what did they do?

Towards the end of 2015, South Africa’s sportswomen were dealt unkind boardroom decisions. Although three SA women’s teams of football, rugby and hockey achieved Rio Olympic qualification, the teams were told they not ‘good enough’ for SASCOC’s medal aspirations. The Olympic berths of South Africa’s women’s hockey and women’s rugby sevens teams have been taken away while Banyana Banyana have escaped narrowly, by virtue of the African Olympic qualifiers being their only route to qualification, despite South Africa’s women’s football team being very weak and lowly ranked internationally.

South Africa’s indulgent sports of men’s sports of cricket, football, rugby and golf have, over generations, attained the sports funding, not because they had the sports prowess but because they were men and were seen as the supreme gender in a male-dominating, male-controlled society.

How is South Africa’s sportswomen expected to be world class and achieve top world rankings when they must struggle for funding? The men’s teams of football, cricket and rugby don’t struggle; they get all their sport needs taken care of. All the sportsmen have to do is turn up and deliver.

Structural inequality exists in the South African sports network and apparatus with white privilege, black middle class access and male privilege dominating access to and participation in sport from grassroots to international domains.

By suffocating development and growth of girls and women in sport, we are depriving millions of girls and women from knowing their worth in sport. Why do we entrench the gender inequalities with screwed and unequal sponsorship? Why do we allow women’s sport to be strangled and men’s sport to thrive.

Non-performing and under-achieving sportsmen should not be recipients and beneficiaries of massive and lucrative sports funding and sponsorship. Performing and achieving sportswomen must be financially supported to achieve in world sport and know their international potential.

The juncture is ripe for sportswomen and women in sport to protest unequal funding in sport. Protest and resistance must disrupt gender inequalities in sport!     vIMG_4036

d participation in sport from grassroots to international domains.
By suffocating development and growth of girls and women in sport, we are depriving millions of girls and women from knowing their worth in sport. Why do we entrench the gender inequalities with screwed and unequal sponsorship? Why do we allow women’s sport to be strangled and men’s sport to thrive.
Non-performing and under-achieving sportsmen should not be recipients and beneficiaries of massive and lucrative sports funding and sponsorship. Performing and achieving sportswomen must be financially supported to achieve in world sport and know their international potential.
The juncture is ripe for sportswomen and women in sport to protest unequal funding in sport. Protest and resistance must disrupt gender inequalities in sport!